Plant a butterfly-hummingbird garden

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What’s a butterfly garden without…hummingbirds!? Why settle for butterflies only in your “butterfly” garden? You can also draw those ever-entertaining bundles of energy — hummingbirds. There are plants favored by butterflies and there are plants sought out by hummingbirds. They aren’t always the same. But there are many varieties that appeal to both and you can take advantage of that. So, go big and plant for butterflies AND hummingbirds.

Following are photos and a list of plants to get you started. All are native to the U.S., and many have additional varieties in their plant family to choose from, so check with your local garden center or online for those best suited to your area.

Native plants for butterflies and hummingbirds

Anise Hyssop (Agastache foeniculum). (photo: Pau Pamies Gracia /  Wiki; CC BY-SA 4.0)

Anise Hyssop (Agastache foeniculum). (Pau Pamies Gracia / Wiki; CC BY-SA 4.0)

 
Beebalm (Monarda fistulosa). (photo by Joshua Mayer / Flickr; CC BY 2.0)

Beebalm (Monarda fistulosa). (Joshua Mayer / Flickr; CC BY 2.0)

 
Cardinal Flower. (H Zell / Wiki; CC BY-SA 3.0)

Cardinal Flower (Lobelia cardinalis). (H Zell / Wiki; CC BY-SA 3.0)

 
Chapman's Gayfeather (Liatris chapmanii). (Bob Peterson / Wiki; CC BY-SA 2.0)

Chapman’s Gayfeather (Liatris chapmanii). (Bob Peterson / Wiki; CC BY-SA 2.0)

 
Great Blue Lobelia (Lobelia siphilitica). Joshua Mayer / Wiki; CC BY-SA 2.0)

Great Blue Lobelia (Lobelia siphilitica). (Joshua Mayer / Wiki; CC BY-SA 2.0)

 
Indian Blanket (Gaillardia pulchella). Mary Keim / EOL; CC BY_NC-SA 2.0)

Indian Blanket (Gaillardia pulchella). (Mary Keim / EOL; CC BY NC-SA 2.0)

 
Joe Pye Weed (Eutrochium spp.). (homeredwardprice / EOL; (CC BY 2.0)

Joe Pye Weed (Eutrochium purpureum). (homeredwardprice / EOL; CC BY 2.0)

 
Any native Larkspur (Delphinium spp.) Shown here is Low Larkspur (Delphinium bicolor). (S. Zenner, NPS  / Wiki; PD)

Low Larkspur, Delphinium bicolor. (S. Zenner, NPS / Wiki; PD)

 
Lantana horrida. (TDogg310 / Wiki; CC BY SA 3.0)

Texas Lantana (Lantana horrida). A shrubby plant that can become invasive in southern areas. (TDogg310 / Wiki; CC BY SA 3.0)

 
Lupine (Lupinis spp.) Shown here is Sky Blue Lupine (Lupinus diffusus). (Bob Peterson / Flickr; CC BY-SA 2.0)

Sky Blue Lupine (Lupinus diffusus). (Bob Peterson / Flickr; CC BY-SA 2.0)

 

Common Mallow (Mallow silvestris). Many mallows are also called hibiscus. (High Mallow (Malva silvestris): David Short / Flickr; CC BY 2.0)

 
Any native milkweed. Shown here is Common Milkweed (Asclepias syriaca). (Jacob Enos / Flickr; CC BY-SA 2.0)

Common Milkweed (Asclepias syriaca). (Jacob Enos / Flickr; CC BY-SA 2.0)

 
Penstemon spp. (photo: Foxglove Penstemon (Penstemon digitalis). (photo: Fritz Flohr Reynolds / Flickr; CC BY-SA 2.0

Foxglove Penstemon (Penstemon digitalis). (Fritz Flohr Reynolds / Flickr; CC BY-SA 2.0

 
Scarlet Sage (Salvia coccinea). (photo by Carl Lewis / Flickr; CC BY 2.0)

Scarlet Sage (Salvia coccinea). (Carl Lewis / Flickr; CC BY 2.0)

 
Wild Blue Phlox (Phlox divaricata). (photo: Fritz Flohr Reynolds / Flickr; CC BY-SA 2.0)

Wild Blue Phlox (Phlox divaricata). (Fritz Flohr Reynolds / Flickr; CC BY-SA 2.0)

 

Yellow Honeysuckle (Lonicera flava). A twining, woody vine. (Missouri Department of Conservation; PD)

 

 

*Painted Lady Butterfly and Ruby-throated Hummingbird, male. (composite image © Dan Ripplinger, DansPhotoArt )

More reading:

Build an insect house   
Free online butterfly garden brochures and plant lists by region   
All about earthworms   

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